{"category":{"version":"591f17ae21d2ff0f00cf5a3f","project":"547cd7662eaee50800ed1089","_id":"591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a47","__v":0,"sync":{"url":"","isSync":false},"reference":false,"createdAt":"2015-03-27T13:16:34.125Z","from_sync":false,"order":7,"slug":"tips-and-tricks","title":"Tips and Tricks"},"parentDoc":null,"project":"547cd7662eaee50800ed1089","user":"547cd6ac78fd57080023ca99","version":{"__v":1,"_id":"591f17ae21d2ff0f00cf5a3f","project":"547cd7662eaee50800ed1089","createdAt":"2017-05-19T16:05:02.775Z","releaseDate":"2017-05-19T16:05:02.775Z","categories":["591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a40","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a41","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a42","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a43","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a44","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a45","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a46","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a47","591f17af21d2ff0f00cf5a48"],"is_deprecated":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_beta":false,"is_stable":true,"codename":"","version_clean":"1.0.1","version":"1.0.1"},"_id":"591f17b321d2ff0f00cf5a66","__v":0,"updates":[],"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"createdAt":"2015-03-27T13:20:19.376Z","link_external":false,"link_url":"","githubsync":"","sync_unique":"","hidden":false,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"isReference":false,"order":40,"body":"[block:callout]\n{\n  \"type\": \"warning\",\n  \"title\": \"Version Numbering Is Applied to Short Bundle Version!\",\n  \"body\": \"These instructions are applied to the `CFBundleShortVersionString` key of `info.plist` file, and you need to state the same value in _'Short Bundle Version'_ field of _'Release Management'_ section of DevMate Dashboard. For _'Bundle Version'_ field use the value of `CFBundleVersion` key.\"\n}\n[/block]\nWhen numbering the versions of your application, DevMate recommends using the standard X.Y.Z pattern, where X, Y and Z correspond to major, minor and patch numbers. Additionally, you can use quantifiers. Read more about those below.\n\n##The Major Number\n\nThe major number is the first integer in the version number. It indicates the number of the major application update. Changes in the major number indicate significant changes in end-user functionality and/or code base. \n\nThe version number should always contain a major number.\n\nExamples: *1.0, 2.3, 5.8.7*\n\n##The Minor Number\n\nThe minor number is the second integer in the version number. It shows the minor update of the application, usually indicates an incremental change in functionality and/or code. Sometimes developers distinguish even and odd minor numbers: even minor numbers are usually super-stable and time-tested while odd minor numbers are not mature or tested superficially.\n\nThe version number should always contain a minor number.\n\nExamples: *1.0, 2.3, 5.8.7*\n\n##The Patch Number \n\nThe patch number is the third integer in the version number. It indicates a bug fix in the functionality or code.\n\nIt is not necessary to include a patch number in the main number. If an application got a new minor or major version and there were no bug fixes yet, the version number should not contain the patch number.\n\nExamples: *1.2.1, 2.2.5* (but not *2.2.0, 3.0.0*).\n\n##Quantifiers\n\nWhen you develop an application, it should be properly tested before going public. Usually, there are three testing stages that can be indicated in the version number: alpha release, beta release, and pre-release. You can use *“a”*, *“b”* and *“rc”* correspondingly to indicate the testing stage in your version numbers.\n\nNote, that application versions with quantifiers in its numbers will be available for users only if your application supports beta version updates and users have agreed to get such updates.\n\nDevMate disallows changing the quantifier after you have created a new version, so please be wise in numbering your application versions.\n\nExamples: *1.0a, 1.3b, 2.2.2rc.*\n\nYou can learn more about versioning [here](http://semver.org).","excerpt":"","slug":"how-to-number-the-versions-of-your-application","type":"basic","title":"Numbering Versions"}

Numbering Versions


[block:callout] { "type": "warning", "title": "Version Numbering Is Applied to Short Bundle Version!", "body": "These instructions are applied to the `CFBundleShortVersionString` key of `info.plist` file, and you need to state the same value in _'Short Bundle Version'_ field of _'Release Management'_ section of DevMate Dashboard. For _'Bundle Version'_ field use the value of `CFBundleVersion` key." } [/block] When numbering the versions of your application, DevMate recommends using the standard X.Y.Z pattern, where X, Y and Z correspond to major, minor and patch numbers. Additionally, you can use quantifiers. Read more about those below. ##The Major Number The major number is the first integer in the version number. It indicates the number of the major application update. Changes in the major number indicate significant changes in end-user functionality and/or code base. The version number should always contain a major number. Examples: *1.0, 2.3, 5.8.7* ##The Minor Number The minor number is the second integer in the version number. It shows the minor update of the application, usually indicates an incremental change in functionality and/or code. Sometimes developers distinguish even and odd minor numbers: even minor numbers are usually super-stable and time-tested while odd minor numbers are not mature or tested superficially. The version number should always contain a minor number. Examples: *1.0, 2.3, 5.8.7* ##The Patch Number The patch number is the third integer in the version number. It indicates a bug fix in the functionality or code. It is not necessary to include a patch number in the main number. If an application got a new minor or major version and there were no bug fixes yet, the version number should not contain the patch number. Examples: *1.2.1, 2.2.5* (but not *2.2.0, 3.0.0*). ##Quantifiers When you develop an application, it should be properly tested before going public. Usually, there are three testing stages that can be indicated in the version number: alpha release, beta release, and pre-release. You can use *“a”*, *“b”* and *“rc”* correspondingly to indicate the testing stage in your version numbers. Note, that application versions with quantifiers in its numbers will be available for users only if your application supports beta version updates and users have agreed to get such updates. DevMate disallows changing the quantifier after you have created a new version, so please be wise in numbering your application versions. Examples: *1.0a, 1.3b, 2.2.2rc.* You can learn more about versioning [here](http://semver.org).